Wai Research

Wai-Research undertakes a research programme that supports Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust to evidence the best outcomes for whānau. In line with Te Whānau o Waipareira 25-year generational strategy, the priority for the research programme is to drive innovation that empowers whānau to prosper.

The research unit is guided by “Nga Taumata Rangahau o Waipareira” research principals, which have been specifically created to reflect the aspirations of our community. Formalised partnerships with other research and indigenous organisations include MoUs with Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development, Massey University and Regroupment des Centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec (RCAAQ).

Current Projects

Kia Pū Te Wai O Pareira – Catalysts of Whānau Health and Wellbeing in Waitakere

This video provides a snapshot of Kia Pū te Wai o Pareira – a research report looking into the catalysts of health and wellbeing for whānau living in Waitakere. This retrospective study highlights the factors that helped these whānau be healthy and resilient over the last 50 years.

Kia Pū te Wai o Pareira has two parts. The first ‘He Kōrero ā-Whānau’ is a first-hand account from over 20 whānau, exploring urbanisation, the birth of Hoani Waititi, the origins of Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust and the emergence of Urban Māori.

The second, ‘Catalysts of Whānau Health and Wellbeing in Waitakere ’ is the more formal technical research report and is the first major study that Wai-Research has conducted which is significant for Waipareira and our Waitakere whānau.

Pēperekōutanga - Kaumātua Needs and Wellbeing

This 12-month research project profiles the needs, aspirations and realities of older Māori, aiming to bridge the research gap currently in this area. It is designed to paint a clear picture of the issues that are currently affecting Māori elders and explore issues that are likely to be affecting our aging population in the future.

Kimihia te Hauora Hinengaro: Pathways to Māori Mental Health

Pathways to Māori Mental Health is a 12-month study which explores the relevance of Māori cultural elements in the provision of therapeutic care for urban Māori in Waitakere. Building upon what is currently known about kaupapa Māori models of mental health service delivery, this project aims to identify existing issues and barriers with the potential to refocus services in this area.

This 12-month research project profiles the needs, aspirations and realities of older Māori, aiming to bridge the research gap currently in this area. It is designed to paint a clear picture of the issues that are currently affecting Māori elders and explore issues that are likely to be affecting our aging population in the future.

PARTNERSHIPS:

Na tou rourou, na toku rourou, ka ora ai te iwi
With your basket and my basket, the people will prosper!
We aspire to develop a community research agenda through meaningful partnerships with external research groups engaging in projects that recognize, value and use principles of Kaupapa Māori. With a focus on collaboration and knowledge sharing we can apply this knowledge in ways that further benefit our people at a whānau level, a community level, nationally and internationally.

Massey University
www.massey.ac.nz
Massey University is working with health service providers to meet the needs of our communities ensuring that we are contributing to positive development of whānau and Māori

Nga Whakauae Research
www.whakauae.co.nz
To assist Māori to reach their potential by sustainably delivering Māori research founded on academic and research excellence, and mātauranga Māori, in a way that brings together Ngāti Hauiti interests, with the interests of Māori in general

WDHB
www.waitematadhb.govt.nz
Waitemata DHB delivers the best care for every single patient/client using our services whether we work directly with patients/clients or support the work of the organisation in other ways.

Regroupement des Centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec (RCAAQ) (Canadian Research)
www.rcaaq.info/en/
The Regroupement des centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec was founded for and by urban Aboriginals who wanted to give themselves a provincial concertation, coordination and representation structure. Since 1976, the RCAAQ represents the interests of the Native Friendship Centres of Québec.